Solved: “Error in required structured data element” (AMP issue)

Required structured data” message is one of the most common issues seen at Google Search Console. In this post, I will explain why this error comes up and how to fix it.

AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages) is a project supported by Google to make web pages faster and more responsive across different devices and web browsers. A library is provided by AMP Project Team for web developers. Google provides tools such as Search and Analytics to build AMP-supported web pages.

In order to check if your website is AMP-ready, go to Google Search Console. If there are any issues in any of your web pages, an error message will be displayed in the Dashboard. Here is one of the most common error messages:

Error in required structured data element
AMP version has invalid structured data

An AMP issue in Google Search Console: "Error in required structured data element"
An AMP issue in Google Search Console: “Error in required structured data element”
Detailed error message
Detailed error message

Are you receiving “Custom JavaScript is not allowed” error message? Check this post out.

Solution to fix “Required structured data element” issue

Google wants to provide a better search experience by showing related pictures near search results. These related pictures (named “Featured Image” in WordPress) should be included in the posts by their authors. If your posts don’t have related pictures, you will probably see “Error in required structured data element” or “AMP version has invalid structured data” message in Google Search Console dashboard.

An example to structured
data in search results
An example to structured
data in search results

In order to solve this AMP issue, simply add featured images to your posts and start re-validation at Google Search Console. Depending on the page count in your website, it may take a few days or weeks to complete re-validation. You will receive an email once it is completed.

For more information about structured date, visit Google’s guideline. There is also a tool to check your site compatibility to Google’s structured data rules.

Difference between Mainstream Support and Extended Support?

One of the questions asked most about Microsoft’s licensing policy is the scope of Extended Support. What does it mean and how long does it last? Who can leverage it?

Microsoft provides 5 years of support for almost all software products including operating systems such as Windows and Windows Server. It also covers development and database tools such as Visual Studio and SQL Server. This initial support period is called Mainstream Support. All security updates, new feature developments, and complimentary support are provided during Mainstream Support. For the end of support dates for Windows Server, check this post out.

Microsoft Extended Support

After the 5-year mainstream support, a new period called Extended Support starts. During the extended support, Microsoft still provides all security updates. However, unlike mainstream support, product design change or new feature addition requests are not accepted and complimentary support is not provided.

Difference between Mainstream and Extended Support

The table below shows the details of support types (Courtesy of Microsoft).

 Type of support Mainstream Support Extended Support
Request to change product design and features  Available  Not available
Security updates  Available  Available
Non-security updates  Available
  • Available only with Extended Hotfix Support
  • Not available for desktop operating system consumer products
Complimentary support1included with license, licensing program2 or other no-charge support programs  Available  Not available3
Paid-support (including pay-per-incident premier and essential support)  Available  Available

1 Refers to phone and online support options.
2 For example, support incidents acquired through the Software Assurance program for server products.
3 Limited complimentary support may be available (varies by product).

For detailed information, please visit Microsoft’s Product Life Cycle Policy page.

As a summary, the in Extended support:

  • No new features are added
  • Complimentary support is not available
  • Non-security fixes are available only if Extended Hotfix Support is purchased
  • Security fixes are available just like Mainstream Support

What is the end of support date for Windows Server?

The growing security threats in digital life and constant need for improved features forces companies to have reasonable end of support date for their Windows Server systems. Microsoft made support timelines easy to find and easy to understand. Let’s have a look at them.

Long story short; Microsoft provides 5 years of support for almost all software products including operating systems such as Windows and Windows Server, development and database tools such as Visual Studio and SQL Server, or other enterprise level products like Exchange Server.

Windows server end of support

In addition to the 5-year support which is called “Mainstream Support”, Microsoft also offers another 5-year support with a smaller scope. The second 5-year period is called “Extended Support”. Therefore, a Windows Server version that was released in 2012 has support until 2022 (Please check the table below for detailed end of support dates).

During the extended support, Microsoft still provides all security updates. However, product design change or new feature addition requests are not accepted during this period.

End of Support Dates for Windows Server versions

OS Version

Begin Mainstream

End of Mainstream

End of Extended

Windows Server 2008 5/6/2008 7/12/2011 7/12/2011
Windows Server 2008 (SP2) 4/29/2009 1/13/2015 1/14/2020
Windows Server 2008 R2 10/22/2009 4/9/2013 4/9/2013
Windows Server 2008 R2 (SP1) 2/22/2011 1/13/2015 1/14/2020
Windows Server 2012 10/30/2012 10/9/2018 1/10/2023
Windows Server 2012 R2 11/25/2013 10/9/2018 10/10/2023
Windows Server 2016 10/15/2016 1/11/2022 1/11/2027

Thanks to Mirazon for this detailed table. For more specific dates and instructions, check Microsoft’s “Product lifecycle” page.

When searching for end of support dates, make sure to distinguish dates for regular server version and R2 version. R2 version of operating systems include all cumulative updates until a certain date so they have a longer support period. For instance, Windows Server 2008 had support until 2011 while Windows Server 2008 R2 has support until 2020.

Looking for IIS Support for Windows Server? Check this post out.